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Posts Tagged ‘neo-gothic’

And now for something a bit different. Not completely different; it’s still a church. But it’s a late 19th century Lutheran church, the only one still preserved in central Munich.

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On my second day Katherine was able to come with me, which was much more fun and less intimidating. (I sort of like and sort of don’t like the riskiness of traveling in a strange city on my own…) But there was still risk involved — for instance, when I kept crossing the street and forgetting which way to look for cars, and was nearly hit by a bus. Killed by a double-decker bus in London, what a way to go.

Onward!

We went to see the London (or Brompton) Oratory, which meant…

We were in Newman country. (more…)

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It’s my goal to get a lot of my backlogged pictures posted before I go to Warsaw at the end of the month (oh yeah! I’m doing that, did I tell you?) — because I’ll have two days (ish) there, a six hour layover in Vienna that I want to take advantage of, and then the first week of November I’m going with the family to Stuttgart, where N.’s parents live. Stuttgart may not be at the top of the list in terms of historical scenery, but N.’s dad is a history buff, and apparently knows a ton about local German history, so he might be able to guide me around and show me some things. N. told me that when he’s visited them here, he’s sought out all of the little medieval churches I’ve found here in Untermenzing and the surrounding neighborhoods, so I know he’s legit. I’m kind of excited about it!

Anyway, I know I’ll have a lot to post, and I want to have some of this other stuff out of the way. So let’s get going.

In this post I’m going to combine two churches because they are sort of similar. The first is the Frauenkirche (or officially, Dom zu unserer lieben Frau, “Cathedral of Our Dear Lady”), the seat of the archbishop of Munich-Freising, and a genuine Gothic church. However, it was badly bombed and had to be rebuilt after WWII, and sometime in the past several decades of liturgical reform it was altered quite a bit inside. The second is St Paul (not actually in the old city), a neo-Gothic church started in 1892 and finished in 1906. This was an era when historical styles like Romanesque and Gothic were revived all over Europe and the US, and all kinds of public and private buildings — libraries, university buildings, courthouses, even private homes — were built in an updated version of these styles. How exactly the updated styles are different from the original, I don’t know enough to say; but I can still usually recognize it. (And obviously location can be an easy giveaway. Hint: any Gothic-looking building in the US is not really from the 13th century.)

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