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Archive for October, 2011

Heilig Geist (Holy Spirit) Kirche is right behind Alter Peter, in between the Marienplatz and the Viktualienmarkt.

This is going to be a quick one, because I really don’t know much about this church. It has a similar feel to Alter Peter, but smaller…

It was once a Gothic church, but remodeled and given a Baroque facade and pillars and stuff, and lots of rococo ornamentation, some (or all?) of it by the Asam brothers (more on them soon.)

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The slightly irksome thing about these old churches, the ones out of the tourist circle, is that they’re locked up most of the week and only open for services. Which is fine, since I *go* to services, but I can feel awkward taking pictures of the whole place before or after.

Anyway, I showed up for an evening Mass at St Georg Dorfkirche, Obermenzing, a while back. There’s also morning prayer on Saturdays, which I haven’t gotten to yet.

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Spielzeug Museum (München)

The Spielzeug (Toy) Museum is in the tower of the Altes Rathaus.

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Medical adventures

I passed out on the train this morning! How did this happen??

On my way to my German class, I was reading “The Bridge on the Drina” on the S-Bahn when I got to this part where this guy is impaled on a stake. It was pretty horrible, and almost before I could sense it, I shifted from regular-level-revulsion to a more visceral reaction that I couldn’t control. I’m normally not that squeamish or sensitive about gore, but this felt kind really strange and out of my control. I tried to skip through it and find the end, but I just kept reading more gross things and my head wouldn’t let it go. It was almost like being nauseated. So I stopped reading, and stood up because we were almost at my stop. I walked over to the door and held onto the poles, and I can remember thinking that it would be okay if I just got off the train, and I felt a little like I was going to throw up.

Then I started feeling dizzy, like you do when you stand up too fast, and then the next thing I remember is being held up by a group of people, who were saying, Hallo? Hallo? Was ist los? Können Sie mich hören? I could understand them, or at least pick up important words, but my brain wouldn’t work enough to respond, even in English. After several more moments I was able to shake my head “no,” but that was all. When the train stopped (at the next stop after mine — and I don’t remember it stopping for my stop, so I might have been out of it for around a minute) they walked me out and sat me down by the wall and took my scarf and coat off. Then after a few seconds when they asked what happened, I could say, “I don’t know,” and they realized I spoke English. They talked with me a little (all of them spoke some English), and described how they’d seen me holding on to the poles but swaying around. Then they called the paramedics, who came several minutes later and checked my blood pressure and blood sugar. I seemed to be okay, but we thought it might have been a combination of standing up too fast, the heat on the train, and maybe some motion sickness.  I didn’t tell them about the book, because I didn’t want to have to explain it all, but I’m pretty sure that was what started it. I’ve been too hot on the S-Bahn a ton before, and nothing this has ever happened.

All three of the people who helped me were really nice; two of them stayed with me until the paramedics came, and one of them even gave me her water bottle. I was really glad that I didn’t, say, fall to the floor of the train and hit my head, or that nothing worse happened, because while I was sitting there waiting for the paramedics, I realized that I’d accidentally left my wallet at home, with my ID, train pass, and the family’s phone number and medical insurance info (which I don’t know by heart). Since I don’t have a cell phone yet, there would’ve been no way to identify me. But luckily, nothing much happened, and I felt shaky and not as clear-headed as usual, but mostly I’m okay. I almost went to my class but after a few minutes I realized my brain was not functioning like normal, and I just went home to rest. I think I might also be in a little bit of shock, because all my head wants to do is space out.

In sum: I read something gruesome and it made me swoon like a Victorian lady. This has never happened before! Bring me my smelling salts!

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A good Saturday

I know I’ve already posted a bunch this week, but I had a beautiful day today and I wanted to share it with you in pictures…

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It’s my goal to get a lot of my backlogged pictures posted before I go to Warsaw at the end of the month (oh yeah! I’m doing that, did I tell you?) — because I’ll have two days (ish) there, a six hour layover in Vienna that I want to take advantage of, and then the first week of November I’m going with the family to Stuttgart, where N.’s parents live. Stuttgart may not be at the top of the list in terms of historical scenery, but N.’s dad is a history buff, and apparently knows a ton about local German history, so he might be able to guide me around and show me some things. N. told me that when he’s visited them here, he’s sought out all of the little medieval churches I’ve found here in Untermenzing and the surrounding neighborhoods, so I know he’s legit. I’m kind of excited about it!

Anyway, I know I’ll have a lot to post, and I want to have some of this other stuff out of the way. So let’s get going.

In this post I’m going to combine two churches because they are sort of similar. The first is the Frauenkirche (or officially, Dom zu unserer lieben Frau, “Cathedral of Our Dear Lady”), the seat of the archbishop of Munich-Freising, and a genuine Gothic church. However, it was badly bombed and had to be rebuilt after WWII, and sometime in the past several decades of liturgical reform it was altered quite a bit inside. The second is St Paul (not actually in the old city), a neo-Gothic church started in 1892 and finished in 1906. This was an era when historical styles like Romanesque and Gothic were revived all over Europe and the US, and all kinds of public and private buildings — libraries, university buildings, courthouses, even private homes — were built in an updated version of these styles. How exactly the updated styles are different from the original, I don’t know enough to say; but I can still usually recognize it. (And obviously location can be an easy giveaway. Hint: any Gothic-looking building in the US is not really from the 13th century.)

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